patmarrin's blog


Transformation Now

“Woman, why are you weeping?” (John 20:13).

Today’s favorite Easter story about Mary of Magdala at the tomb is a story about coming to faith and about the mysterious transformation we call the resurrection.

Monday Morning

“Do not be afraid” (Matt 28:10).

The first Monday morning after any celebration is always the test of its staying power. Even for the first disciples, Easter Sunday passed into Monday morning and the question, “Where do we go from here?”

Easter

“They have taken the Lord from the tomb, and we don’t know where they put him” (John 9:3).

Gold, it is said, was used in icon images of the risen Christ to reflect the faces of those who used them as prayer aids. God’s glory is impenetrable, so all we see is our own reflection, and this puts the mystery of faith where it belongs—in us. We must decide the meaning of what we are seeing.

TGIF

“It is finished” (John 19:30).

Holy Thursday

“He loved his own in the world and he loved them to the end” (John13:2).

Judas

“Surely it is not I, Lord” (Matt 26:22).

The scriptures for a third time linger on the betrayal of Jesus. He casts a deep shadow over their Passover meal by saying, “One of you will betray me.” In distress, they reply one after the other, “Surely it is not I, Lord.” Perhaps even Judas, to deflect attention, feigns innocence by asking the same question. But he has already determined in his heart to hand Jesus over to the authorities, and he already has the 30 pieces of silver in his pocket.

Betrayed

“And it was night” (John 13:30).

Betrayal is always an inside job. Someone with intimate connections or knowledge of another’s thoughts and intentions shares that insight with enemies, enabling then to gain access or the opportunity to take down their intended target. Betrayal requires deception, an outer face that shows loyalty while an inner face plots abandonment.

Battle Plan

"Though an army encamp against me, my heart will not fear" (Ps 27).

Man on a Donkey

“Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord” (Matt 11:10).

The utter improbability of the Gospel is apparently something the early church was eager to proclaim. By worldly standards, the arrival of the Messiah, hailing from Nazareth in Galilee, riding into Jerusalem on an ass to purify the Temple was a perfect parody of royal and imperial power. Behold, the clown prince of Yellow Dog, Tennessee, blowing into Washington, DC, on a tractor to clean up Congress and save the world.

Man on a Donkey

“Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord” (Matt 11:10).

The utter improbability of the Gospel is apparently something the early church was eager to proclaim. By worldly standards, the arrival of the Messiah, hailing from Nazareth in Galilee, riding into Jerusalem on an ass to purify the Temple was a perfect parody of royal and imperial power. Behold, the clown prince of Yellow Dog, Tennessee, blowing into Washington, DC, on a tractor to clean up Congress and save the world.