Daily Bread - November 26, 2017

Daily Bread

November 26, 2017

Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

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About Daily Bread

Homiletic starters and scriptural reflection points for each day of the month

The Lectionary provides a kind of spiritual script for the universal church that keeps us, literally, all on the same page as we journey through the liturgical seasons. These short reflections, written by four authors who meet regularly to share the readings, are intended to help daily preachers and others who pray from the assigned scriptures each day to orient themselves to the Living Word addressed to the church in the world.

About the authors

Jeanne Lischer lives near Kansas City, Missouri, where she is an ordained United Church of Christ minister.  She serves two churches in Missouri. She shares her home with daughter, Sally, two cats, and a dog. Originally from St. Louis, she has also lived in Ghana, West Africa.

Mary Joshi lives in Moncton, New Brunswick, and is our first Canadian Daily Bread baker. Raised Catholic and married to a Hindu with whom she has two daughters, Mary has been challenged to examine, clarify and articulate her faith, which has informed her primary work as the RCIA coordinator for her three-parish unit and reflection writer for the parish bulletin. Her education includes degrees in history, English and deaf education.

Miguel Dulick lives in a mountain village in Honduras, Central America. Originally from St. Louis, he holds degrees from St. Louis University and Weston School of Theology, Boston.

Paige Byrne Shortal, longtime contributor to Celebration, serves as coordinator for the Daily Bread writers. She is recently retired after forty years in pastoral ministry — twenty years at St. Francis Xavier (College) Church on the campus of Saint Louis University and twenty years at St. Francis Borgia in Washington, Missouri.

Patricia Russell graduated from Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with degrees in English and secondary education. She teaches high school theology, English and creative writing in Washington, Missouri. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you subscribe to Daily Bread e-mail alerts, please add "support@celebrationpublications.org" to your safe sender list to be sure you receive e-mails from us.

Daily Bread - November 19, 2017

Daily Bread

November 19, 2017

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About Daily Bread

Homiletic starters and scriptural reflection points for each day of the month

The Lectionary provides a kind of spiritual script for the universal church that keeps us, literally, all on the same page as we journey through the liturgical seasons. These short reflections, written by four authors who meet regularly to share the readings, are intended to help daily preachers and others who pray from the assigned scriptures each day to orient themselves to the Living Word addressed to the church in the world.

About the authors

Jeanne Lischer lives near Kansas City, Missouri, where she is an ordained United Church of Christ minister.  She serves two churches in Missouri. She shares her home with daughter, Sally, two cats, and a dog. Originally from St. Louis, she has also lived in Ghana, West Africa.

Mary Joshi lives in Moncton, New Brunswick, and is our first Canadian Daily Bread baker. Raised Catholic and married to a Hindu with whom she has two daughters, Mary has been challenged to examine, clarify and articulate her faith, which has informed her primary work as the RCIA coordinator for her three-parish unit and reflection writer for the parish bulletin. Her education includes degrees in history, English and deaf education.

Miguel Dulick lives in a mountain village in Honduras, Central America. Originally from St. Louis, he holds degrees from St. Louis University and Weston School of Theology, Boston.

Paige Byrne Shortal, longtime contributor to Celebration, serves as coordinator for the Daily Bread writers. She is recently retired after forty years in pastoral ministry — twenty years at St. Francis Xavier (College) Church on the campus of Saint Louis University and twenty years at St. Francis Borgia in Washington, Missouri.

Patricia Russell graduated from Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with degrees in English and secondary education. She teaches high school theology, English and creative writing in Washington, Missouri. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you subscribe to Daily Bread e-mail alerts, please add "support@celebrationpublications.org" to your safe sender list to be sure you receive e-mails from us.

Daily Bread - November 12, 2017

Daily Bread

November 12, 2017

  Sign up to receive Daily Bread by email

 

About Daily Bread

Homiletic starters and scriptural reflection points for each day of the month

The Lectionary provides a kind of spiritual script for the universal church that keeps us, literally, all on the same page as we journey through the liturgical seasons. These short reflections, written by four authors who meet regularly to share the readings, are intended to help daily preachers and others who pray from the assigned scriptures each day to orient themselves to the Living Word addressed to the church in the world.

About the authors

Jeanne Lischer lives near Kansas City, Missouri, where she is an ordained United Church of Christ minister.  She serves two churches in Missouri. She shares her home with daughter, Sally, two cats, and a dog. Originally from St. Louis, she has also lived in Ghana, West Africa.

Mary Joshi lives in Moncton, New Brunswick, and is our first Canadian Daily Bread baker. Raised Catholic and married to a Hindu with whom she has two daughters, Mary has been challenged to examine, clarify and articulate her faith, which has informed her primary work as the RCIA coordinator for her three-parish unit and reflection writer for the parish bulletin. Her education includes degrees in history, English and deaf education.

Miguel Dulick lives in a mountain village in Honduras, Central America. Originally from St. Louis, he holds degrees from St. Louis University and Weston School of Theology, Boston.

Paige Byrne Shortal, longtime contributor to Celebration, serves as coordinator for the Daily Bread writers. She is recently retired after forty years in pastoral ministry — twenty years at St. Francis Xavier (College) Church on the campus of Saint Louis University and twenty years at St. Francis Borgia in Washington, Missouri.

Patricia Russell graduated from Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with degrees in English and secondary education. She teaches high school theology, English and creative writing in Washington, Missouri. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you subscribe to Daily Bread e-mail alerts, please add "support@celebrationpublications.org" to your safe sender list to be sure you receive e-mails from us.

Planning for November 26, 2017

The Solemnity of Christ the King poses a challenge each year involving how we understand kingship in relation to Christ, who refused to be called a king during his earthly life. Today’s first reading and Gospel seem to focus our attention this year on Christ as our judge. The first reading ends with these words: “I will judge between one sheep and another, between rams and goats.” The Gospel depicts the risen Christ as our judge at the end of time.

The image of judge, however, is tempered somewhat by the fact that both readings depict the judge as a shepherd, too. Shepherds care for the sheep, so the image of the judge is not one focused primarily on condemnation. Certainly, the point of proclaiming both readings is to urge us to live so that we will be recognized as faithful sheep ready for the glory of the kingdom.

Homily for November 26, 2017

The Solemnity of Christ the King concludes the liturgical year with the assertion that, despite the ominous end-of-time imagery featured in the preceding weeks, God is the ultimate power in the universe.

But what does God’s power look like? If Jesus represents God’s kingship, then divine power is both mysterious and paradoxical. Earthly power is the capacity to force others by threat or violence to do what you want. Kings are the image of power, dominating their subjects and their adversaries.

Prayers for November 26, 2017

Introduction

Some of the most dramatic biblical imagery comes on this last Sunday of our liturgical year. The overall imagery on this feast is striking: Israel’s rulers do not adequately care for their people; so, God will do it, as both shepherd and judge. But, the responsibility for the neediest shifts in the Gospel. When the Son of Man comes in glory, he will judge us for our acts of mercy. We cannot look to God to care for those in need. The job is now ours, and the King now judges us.

Penitential Act

  • Lord Jesus, you declared that you will come again in glory: Lord, have mercy.
  • Christ Jesus, you will judge us on our treatment of others: Christ, have mercy.
  • Lord Jesus, you challenge us to care for the least among us: Lord, have mercy.

Scripture Readings

Commentary for November 26, 2017

The end of the world. How do you imagine it? In 1920, Robert Frost pondered this same question in the poem, “Fire and Ice”:

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire,
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice
I think I know enough of hate,
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

Planning for November 19, 2017

Today’s Gospel passage is well-known and led to our common use of the word “talent” to mean a special ability. In biblical times, a talent was a measure of weight as well as a unit of value equivalent to that weight of a precious metal. So, the parable is really about investing money, but it led to using the word to mean ability.

Planners might focus more on that adapted use of the term than on investment issues. The Lectionary seems to do this, as well. Note that the first reading speaks of the abilities of a good wife, not of money or investing. While modern feminists might quibble today with the abilities it highlights, the passage points us toward considering the abilities we need for the celebration of the liturgy.

Homily for November 19, 2017

By Jennifer Green

I usually begin my high school theology class by asking my sophomores to reflect on their personal image of God. Their initial descriptions of God are fairly typical and obviously scriptural: father, shepherd, dove, Jesus. But they also list several images from culture; the two most popular are an old man with a white beard sitting on a cloud and, of course, Morgan Freeman. The exercise gets a bit more interesting when I challenge my students to figure out how their dominant image of God was formed. Often, the image is literally just that — an image, usually in the form of a painting hanging in a grandparent’s home. The students are surprised when we peruse the vast scriptural images of God. Pointing out examples of a feminine image of God really blows their minds. They begin to make a connection between their personal understanding of God and how they, in turn, respond.

Commentary for November 19, 2017

 

By Mary McGlone

Our Scriptures were formed through a process of experience, reflection and oral tradition that was eventually written down, all under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. Keeping that in mind, we might listen to today’s readings as if hearing the oral tradition, as if we were younger disciples listening to our predecessors. Imagine that we’re hearing some of the elders who walked with Jesus and heard him weave parables to suit every occasion. These people also knew Paul and the communities he founded.

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